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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 181 (some duplicates have been removed)
will in the future. his surprise showing in the election could make him a key player in coalition talks. flash floods in the andes, supply is contaminated. also in the program, aaron is here with the latest business news. looks like a shy and is coming off of apple? >> we are looking at a shift in the technology world. apple shares bit more than 30% in the last few months. the new iphone is stumbling. the question is this, are the best days of apple behind them? >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, 2:00 p.m. in jerusalem, 12 noon in london, where david cameron has said it is time to give the british people a choice about membership in the european union. the prime minister pledged to hold a simple in or out referendum by the end of 2017. but the catch is he may not be prime mr. by then. and there are already plenty of voices in your saying that membership is not like a menu where you get to pick and choose. our political correspondent reports. >> it had been a long time coming, but at last david cameron delivered his big speech in europe. he began with what had gone wrong. not everyone, he said, wanted
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
democratic elections to take place in the north african country in 1991. when the islamic salvation front won the first round, the government called off the voting and cracked down on islamists, forcing many underground. including a notorious terrorist leader with ties to al qaeda. he is reportedly behind this week's attack on the remote desert gas plant. though he first made a name for himself with a string of violent attacks and dramatic kidnappings after he joined an extremist group in the late 1990's. the terror has continued to this day, but the extremists seemed to be losing support. for many algerians, even an authoritarian regime is preferable to an islamist state. algeria is rich in resources, especially gas and oil. and it has hardly any public debt, but average algerians see little benefit from the country's richest. although there is great dissatisfaction from the government, it has not helped the islamists' cause. there's too much fear the country could once again descend into civil war. >> france is reporting some initial successes in mali where government troops had recaptured
're not doing this again. i've already had this conversation with lou about nine or ten days after the election. he's moaning and groaning, and i said, lou, will you stop it, we're americans, we'll figure this out. and i just spent 15 minutes giving lou holtz a pep talk. >> well, good news for republicans, lou holtz hasn't been the best predictor when it comes to college football, so maybe he's off on this prediction as well. anyway, boehner's message to stick together before a group that is known for being more centrist was no accident. and boehner joked about his own vulnerability in his conference, making this joke after being introduced by former congressman mike hocksly. >> when he gave me this introduction, he was talking about how no one questioned my integrity, no one questioned my patriotism, no one questioned my conservatism. huh. where the hell have you been?! >> boehner successfully corralled those members yesterday, though. the house passed a bill to suspend the debt ceiling for four months until may 19th, avoiding a showdown over the federal borrowing limit. backing off a demand f
election, a tough fight on the fiscal cliff, and with even more fiscal deadlines looming, can republicans regroup? joining me now, republican tom price, vice chair of the budget committee and on the front lines of this battle. congressman price, apologies for my voice. i'll try to keep my questions short. >> nice hearing your voice today, chuck, so good health to you. >> thank you, sir. is this a retreat? on one hand, it's a tactical -- looks like a tactical retreat. you guys had set a precedent, you thought, that any time you raised the debt ceiling, it would be $1 for spending cuts for every dollar in debt ceiling raised. that is not what you got this time. and you have put the focus on senate democrats, a political tactic, perhaps a very successful one. but is that really a tactical retreat? >> i don't think so at all, chuck. and i was curious to hear steny's comments about this being a gimmick. 86 democrats supported the bill that we had on the floor yesterday, the no budget, no pay, so clearly they didn't think it was a gimmick. this was a bipartisan effort. look, if you look at the
terrorists. >> elections had been planned for april. that is now completely up in the air. even if the military intervention is a short one, mali is likely to remain politically unstable for some time to come. >> coming up, floods are causing havoc in the indonesian capital. >> first, here's a look at some of the news. >> syrian activists are reporting a new massacre by government forces. the syrian observatory for human rights says pro-assad troops killed more than 100 civilians on tuesday. witnesses are reported as saying troops hunting rebel fighters slotted entire families, including women and children -- slaughtered entire families including women and children. >> new demands come as pakistan's chief anti- corruption official refused the supreme court order to a rust -- arrest the prime minister over lack of evidence. m in the u.s. president's gun control proposals face an uncertain future. there's no majority in either house of congress with resistance from both republicans and democrats. gun supporters have also launched an advertising campaign against obama's move. the p
. and germany's ruling party tries to hold onto power in a key regional election. >> do i have remorse? absolutely. >> lance armstrong apologizes, but can he rebuilt his tarnished reputation? >>> the algerian hostage crisis is over. special forces stormed the remote gas plant, killing 11 gunmen after they took the lives of 74 hostages. -- took the lives of 7 4 hostages. dozens of people are still unaccounted for. at 29 gunmen said to have links with al qaeda are thought to have been killed. >> the first photo to emerge out of what happened shows hostages kneeling captive in the desert. in other pictures broadcast by algerian tv, they are shown group against a wall. we don't know how many of these people survived what was to come. army helicopter swooped over the complex as they were cornered by algerian special forces. the hopes of a clinical rescue operation and release of hostages have been dashed, state media reporting that seven hostages and 11 militants were killed in the final assault. workers from britain, the u.s., japan, and norway are still among those unaccounted for. in nor
were reelected in the general election here in 2015, it would be part of their mandate and the platform that there would offer the british people and in-out referendum around 2018. so five years from now. the great concern of this, even if there is agreement in the european union, the great concern is that now a leading prime minister from a leading european country has said the sellout and other european countries might follow suit. the worry in big european capitals like paris and berlin is whether this will be criticized and if europe will only be as strong as its most skeptical parts. and the worry is that europe might start to collapse from the outside in words. so i don't think that they will take this speech very kindly one bit. i certainly don't think that they will want to acknowledge the kind of change that mr. chairman has said is necessary. >> israel's prime minister and his right-wing bloc has done worse than expected in parliamentary elections. benjamin netanyahu is coming victory. now he has to negotiate with other fiscal parties to form a broader coalition. >> i am proud
an inflation target of 2%. >>> people in israel are casting ballots in a prime election. benjamin netanyahu is expected to keep his job. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." central bank policy makers have agreed to give shinzo abe what he wants, a 2% inflation target. it's part of abe's plan to tackle deflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. bank of japan and eight others agreed on it saying they. boj officials have previously made it a goal to bring 1% inflation within reach but the new, clearer target requires some bold steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new program from january 2014 the central bank will purchase a certain amount of financial assets every month. no termination date is being set for the scheme. the new measure will expand the total size of the asset purchase program, or app, by about 10 trillion yen, or $110 billion, i
are seeing since the elections, that's for sure, a question who he will be, as he moves into the second term slam. lot of talk about lincoln's second inaugural, which i think by standards is the gold standard and the greatest of the second inaugural addresses that we know. >> because? >> because it came at the pivotal moment of maximum peril for the nation and it was a real statement about how we could be larger as a democracy and reembrace those who had been against the country and come back together. but i have been looking at franklin ross vel's second inaugur inaugural, 1937, which is interesting, because it was a very can candid, honest progress report about what had not yet been accomplished coming out of the great depression but also a statement how we had to come together, useself government as the most noble expression. and use very precise terms, if you go back and look that the speech there is very real room for president obama now to say to the country, these are the things that will are left undone that we, together, must find a way to do >> michael, as a speechwriter first, who
doesn't have to worry about being re-elected. he's got four years left and it's an opportunity for him to really go for it. >> well, i think we're going to see a president with a new level and a new kind of resolve as we did through the campaign. i think we're going to see some of the things we heard about already in terms of immigration reform and new moves around gun safety. i think we'll see some progress on the peacekeeping around the world, and we will see an emphasis on economic growth, which is absolutely key. >> now, he's obviously facing big, tough challenges certainly economically, and also with the republicans who still hold the house. it's a fine line, isn't it? he's already shown a sign since he got re-elected he's not going to take any nonsense from the republicans and he's being pretty tough on them. but that's not necessarily going to help him get stuff done. it may, if anything, make them more intransgent. how does he play that tricky line? >> well, you know, probably he's the better one to answer that question, but i think it's more and more apparent to the american p
days after a tough re-election victory over republican mitt romney but right back to work for a president getting regular updates on the terror attack in algeria a reminder of the grave threat from al qaeda, one of many looming second-term challenges hanging over the swearing in where the aides say the address will bring the nation together. >> people here in washington need to seek common ground he will make that point. >> there are other signs suggesting the opposite such as defiant tone at the news conference last week and a new group made up of fore campaign aides now planning to pressure congress. >> i was surprised this week to see him transition the campaign committee into an ongoing campaign-style effort to have an impact on the washington debate because it doesn't seem the lesson of the first term that worked out very well. >> those battles begin again on tuesday, for now it is pomp and circumstance. >> starting with vice president biden getting sworn in after 8:00 a.m. because justice sotomayor had to rush to new york city for a book signing. >> we will walk out,
, the question is what urgency to do they place on that. we had an election two months ago where there were two candidates, one was more focused on cutting the deficit and reducing our long term debt and one didn't think it was a big concern. the one who didn't think it was a big concern won the election. yes, voters seem to say that is an issue they agree with, but when it came to election day two months ago that certainly wasn't one of the top issues they voted on because they voted for the candidate who wasn't embody go it. >> heather: through his actions, as well. that leads to this, how f or if it should be raised? should the debt limit be raised again, 23% say yes, but 69% don't agree with the president. they say raise it only after major cuts. there again what cuts would those be but president obama as we know he increased the debt by $6 trillion in his if you are four years. some say that administration overspent by one trillion a year every year since he's been in office. now she demanding the get ceiling to be increased again. do you think he will be listen to the 69% that say only af
-than-expected showing in tuesday's elections. near-final totals showed his bloc and its allies had only 60 of 120 seats in parliament. netanyahu signaled he'll reach out to a new centrist party that made a strong showing. it favors a new focus on making peace with the palestinians. this was election day in jordan. voters cast ballots in the country's first parliamentary elections since the arab spring. the new legislature will have more power, including the ability to choose the next prime minister. some two million people were eligible to go to the polls. turnout estimates varied from a high of 56% to as low as 47% as the day went on. several islamist groups boycotted, saying the election was stacked against them. but the prime minister dismissed their actions. >> ( translated ): the weakness of the turnout, if it exists, and i am not saying that, nobody should think that it is because of the boycott. it is not correct. otherwise anyone would think if there was any hesitation for the elections it's because people were neither convinced with past elections nor with the performance of the past parliamen
, as well. this as you say was history. 16th president to win election to two consecutive terms and be sworn in. now, they have all the ceremonial swearings tomorrow. this more intimate friend in the blue room, family and close friends. amid all the constitutional moments there was also a light family moment where a dad got to talk to his daughter, take a listen. >> thank you sir. [ applause ] >> i did it. all right. thank you everybody. >> reporter: i did it, he said and sasha said you didn't mess up. vice president biden got to try this out first very early this morning. reason why it was so early is that just sotomayor had to get on to a train to go to new york city to sign her books. she was trying to get to barnes & noble this afternoon in new york city. >> gregg: you got to plug that book, that is more than the vice president of the united states. your publisher wants more book sales. [ laughter ] >> gregg: how might tomorrow's big speech by the president really set the tone and tenor for policy in his second term? >> reporter: very important. saw president bush try to do this in 2005
an inflation target of 2%. >>> people in israel are casting ballots in a general election. prime minister netanyahu is expected to keep his job. but the country may shift further to the right. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." japan's central bank policymakers agreed to give shinzo abe what he's been pushing for, a 2% inflation target. it's included in the boj plan with the government. it's part of abe's plan to tackle deflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. bank of japan governor and eight other board members agreed on a policy at the end of a two-day meeting. the announcement says financial authorities will try to reach the target at their earliest possible time. boj officials have previously made it a goal to bring 1% inflation within reach but the new, clearer target requires some bold steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new prog
election. but one year later, military forces carried out a coup on the grounds they were protecting the republican system. >> translator: algerian history has a precedent for terrorist tactics leading to victory. in the case of the war of independence against france. so in a sense there's a kind of justification for terrorism. and at the same time there's the idea of never surrendering in the face of terror coming from the enemy. >> reporter: the civil war claimed the lives of 200,000 people. it involved indiscriminate bombings and widespread human rights violations. the president was elected for the first time in 1999. he was re-elected in 2004 and 2009. he chose to deal with militant groups in two ways. he invited them to lay down their weapons to participate in rebuilding the nation. and at the same time he continued cracking down on their activities. observers say this approach has gained broad support amongst the public. >> translator: the government was afraid that negotiating with the kidnappers and making concessions could lead to a loss of legitimacy. so from the historical
. >> this was an inaugural address where the president came out said i won the election and i'm going to be aggressive in the second term about pushing my agenda. >> and i think we had a clarifying moment and the president's speech put to rest, put to rest the idea that barack obama is a moderate. barack obama is a liberal. >> i don't think that absolutism, i'm sure the president would say the same, on the part of either party or any politician is helpful in terms of solving problems and obviously, if we're going to move forward we're going to have to find a way to come together to solve these problems. >> now dually reelected, he intends to pursue the course of that liberalism. he's going to pursue it as if he had from the election an enormous mandate. >> when i heard that was a liberal speech, i don't think it was a liberal speech, i think it's a popular speech. >> and the battle lines are clearly drawn and i don't think there's hope of-- barring unforeseen developments, that we'll have the unity that people in washington wished for so long. >> we believe strongly there are areas in common that we c
believes since the re-election, the president has gotten more come bative. in the latest fox poll released shortly before the inauguration, 55% of voters said he has been more confrontationm toward congressional republicans. only 30% said he has been more bipartisan. >> i regret that i didn't hear one word from the president about it's time we all sat down and worked together. an addressed these issues that are confronting the nation. it is what it is. >> white house officials note the president tried for weeks to work out a budget deal with boehner. >> even though - wildly recognized to have been made in good faith and to have represented an effort to meet the republicans halfway, the republicans walked away. >> now boehner's aides note the president warned the speaker if he didn't agree to tax increases and a long-term hi ceiling, the president would campaign against him for the next two years, charging he caused another recession. which is why boehner's aides say anailiation is the right word. >> bret: ed henry live on the north lawn. thank you. what do republicans plan to do about it?
of american freedom and democracy. for the 57th time in our history, a president freely elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our c
, his inaugural speech was very domestically focused. look, we just had elections in israel, john kerry not in the same place benjamin netanyahu is regarding a two-state solution, at least right now. there are huge challenges, iran, there are huge challenges in the foreign policy front that don't get talked about as much, but are clearly things that not only will be difficult for the president and his team to navigate, but will also have a significant say in how this president is viewed by history. >> and, by the way, we just got word that the white house is going to proceed with a nomination of general allen to be the nato supreme allied commander now that he's been cleared by the pentagon investigation going back to the petraeus case. thanks to all of you, david sanger and kelly o'donnell, of course, and chris cillizza, see you later. thanks very much. >>> clinton today put a lot of blame on congress for withholding aid. >> we have to get our act together between the administration and congress. if this is a priority and if we are serious about trying it help this government stand up
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
this being a triptic, which was the election night speech and the inaugural speech, and now we have the state of the union. what do we expect from that in terms of how aor specific on the policy that he gestured towards yesterday. >> i think he has to keep up this pressure going forward, and i think the real question i think we'll be looking for tea leaves in the state of the union address to what extent does he want to keep these as issues and continue building momentum. he believes coming out of the 2012 election that there is an emerging majority that will only get stronger going forward, and he talked to the white house. they talk about what they can get done in the next two years. the next four years. our work will not be done here. >> the work begins anew. >> the work will continue after me. so on an issue like global warming, there is not some big legislative package coming this year on global warming. they don't even have democratic votes for that. what obama is doing is seeding the ground, beginning the discussion to kind of shift the popular perception of global warming, and that is
legislative election. the second round was cancelled with the expectation they would have won a majority. a splinter group needed outside support. that's when it announced affiliation with al qaeda. it was a sign of their weakness that they needed to reach out to this global network. i think of them as actors that are thinking locally but acting globally. the extent to which they have resources may not reflect their actual support. i would not say this represents mass support on the part of ordinary algerian people. it is much more complex. they developed networks within southern algeria and some networks the torreg. >> the french have doubled the number of troops on the ground in mali. the defense minister of the country says there are 1400 soldiers trying to retake rebel- controlled towns. diabaly is 400 meters from the capital. french air strikes near diabaly have done little. chad has promised to send thousands of soldiers and hundreds of nigerian troops are expected to arrive. muhammed is in the capital with a report. what is the latest? >> elizabeth, we have been speaking with resi
in support for the secular brand that has been dominating had been -- headlines. the story of this election has not been so much about winners and losers as it has the power of the far right parties and which one netanyahu will take to be the next coalition government. >> in october netanyahu's foreign minister announced he would run on a single ballot. he looked likely to take a larger portion of seats in the new parliament, but in the last few weeks they have been losing support, mainly to this man. the 40-year-old millionaire encapsulates the emergence and acceptance of far right nationalism and israeli politics. bennet has run on a platform of restoring jewish values june politics as well as lowering cost of living. another man for the moment, the tv press center could become third in the elections and also be a coalition partner for netanyahu. rather than security issues, it is the economy that is dominating the of said -- the debate. netanyahu maybe on his way to another victory, but it is far from plain sailing. the parties are likely to be ideologically different. for netanyahu, win
relationship with the state. >> the state does not influence the election of the patriarch or the appointment of the bishops or anything related to the internal life of the cherished. the church, in its turn, is not involved in politics. >> use a the church is not involved in politics, but ahead of the presidential election, the patriarch said that the last haveears of putin's rule been a miracle from god. there's a sense that the orthodox church has been supporting them. but i would say there was no official endorsement of one candidate against another candidate. but people from the church and not only from the russian orthodox church, but from other traditional churches, they met with mr. putin as a presidential candidate. each of them was able to say what they think. craig moe buttered always support vladimir putin? will the church always support vladimir putin? >> it depends on how they act. the official position of the church says that there are actions that are contrary to a good christian morality, and the church can call for various forms of civil disobedience. >> now, a beijing photo
to run for elected office. >> none? that's a flat no. >> that's it. i have no plans. absolutely. >> okay. well, thank you very much. thanks for joining us today. we'll follow, of course, your crusade, your campaign with mayor bloomberg on the issue of guns. >> okay. thank you, andrea. thank you for having me. >> at least 40 hostages, including americans, are believed to have been taken hostage on a raid on an algerian gas plant. there are wlikting reports about the state of the hostage crisis. joining me now nbc news chief pentagon correspondent jim miklacevski. >> what is the pentagon telling you and leon panetta was travel and has been talking to reporters along the way, but do we know more about exactly what happened in this shoot-out? >> u.s. officials all along have said the details are murky, and here's what we know and what we don't know. about seven hours almost 24 hours after the hostages were taken by those armed militants, al qaeda-linked militants at that bp malgas plant there in algeria, the algerian military launched what was supposed to be a hostage rescue operation. as we
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 181 (some duplicates have been removed)